Tuesday, 18 September 2018

"interpreter not present"


18 September 2018

[…] According to the Standard, board chairman Brian Parrott said the case exposed ‘unexpected levels of ignorance and inappropriate actions’ by the police and council.
This included a Romanian interpreter not being present for social services interviews but her stepfather being allowed to take part. […]

Saturday, 15 September 2018

"no interpreter was available for a 999 call"


15 September 2018

[…] On January 2 this year, no interpreter was available for a 999 call, meaning a patient did not have a clinician consultation.
This was classed as a form of ineffective triage. […]

Tuesday, 11 September 2018

PQ: 11 September 2018



Asylum: Interpreters
Home Office written question – answered on 11th September 2018.

Bridget Phillipson Labour, Houghton and Sunderland South
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what measures are in place to ensure that interpreters of interviews during the asylum process are able to translate to a high quality and produce work to an accredited standard.

All asylum interviews are carried out by an impartial interviewing officer.
All interpreters engaged by the Home Office must demonstrate they have the required skills and qualifications. They must also:
  • be a full member of the National Register of Public Services Interpreters (NRPSI), or
  • hold a Diploma in Public Services Interpreting (DPSI) (Law) or a letter of Credit in all oral components (Law), or
  • have been assessed by the Asylum and Immigration Tribunal (AIT) (formerly the Immigration Appellate Authority), or
  • have been assessed by the Metropolitan Police.
They are also bound by a “Code of Conduct” to ensure minimum standards for interpreting and behaviour.
Home Office policy and guidance ensures that in the event of interpreters or interviews falling short of those standards, it would not adversely affect an individual’s asylum claim.
Interviewing Officers are encouraged to provide feedback on the performance of interpreters, using specifically designed monitoring forms. Interviews may also be monitored for training and security purposes.