Friday, 19 October 2018

GP communication issues could lead to 'preventable deaths' in Darlington


19/10/18

GP communication issues could lead to 'preventable deaths' in Darlington
[…] Researchers found that translation and interpretation services commissioned by NHS England and employed by GP services in the area were often inappropriate and failed to acknowledge the variation of regional dialects spoken in the town.
Sajna Miah, who assisted with the report, said Darlington's large Bangladeshi population spoke a different dialect, for example, than the Bangladeshi interpreters used by GP surgeries.
She said a failure to adequately match interpretation services to local needs could lead to communication breakdowns with potentially severe consequences, citing the example of one young man who recently had surgery cancelled due to an failure in interpretation.
Ms Miah said nationally commissioned services should be adapted to suit the varied needs of each town, adding: “Every town has different needs and 70 languages are spoken in Darlington. […]

Thursday, 11 October 2018

Rochdale translation firm ordered to pay more than £240,000 for diverting third of government language contractor's website traffic


11 October 2018

Rochdale translation firm ordered to pay more than £240,000 for diverting third of government language contractor's website traffic
A Rochdale interpreting service that set up bogus websites to mimic a world-leading language translation company managed to divert a third of its internet traffic for almost three years, it was revealed in court on Wednesday.
Little-known Language Empire Ltd masqueraded as the UK government’s go to interpreter and translation provider, thebigword, at two websites 'specifically designed' to syphon off business from the global contractor.
During 34 months of passing itself off as the leading language business it is believed Language Empire Ltd landed lucrative translation contracts from the NHS, police forces, civil service departments and blue-chip companies worth tens of thousands of pounds.
In a landmark judgement at London’s Intellectual Property Enterprise Court, the Rochdale-based business - based at Deeplish House on Milkstone Street - was ordered to pay double the damages sought by thebigword, after a judge agreed it made “significant sales” by converting enquiries from the websites.
The court heard that once the websites were taken down after being live for two years and ten months, thebigword – which lists on its website several top 100 global brands, government departments, UK police forces and NHS trusts as clients – saw an instant 50% rise in its website traffic.
Judge Melissa Clarke described the rise in traffic as “the best quantitative evidence I have of the effect of the websites on the claimant’s business.” And she described it as a “diversion of a significant amount of the claimant’s potential business”.
She told Yasar Zaman, CEO of Language Empire, that the domain names bigwordtranslation.co.uk and thebigwordtranslation.co.uk, bought on his debit card and developed into bootleg websites, were “specifically designed” to capture potential customers searching online for thebigword.
The imposter websites went live during the second half of 2014, the court heard, with logos using the words ‘The Big Word Translation’, and content that read: 'Welcome to The Big Word Translation, the right place for professional translation services of the highest standard. Delivering translations in over 400 different languages and offering a 24 hour service has made us one of the UK’s most popular providers of translation services'.
The sites also included calls-to-action that offered a 'Free no obligation quote', a copyright notice '© 2014 The Big Word Translation. All rights reserved' and a contact form that delivered fresh enquiries directly to the websites’ developer and SEO ‘expert’ Rajeev Singh, who Zaman hired to them set up.
Singh funnelled enquiries back to Yasar Zaman through an email address belonging to his brother, Nasir Zaman. From there the diverted business was converted into sales, likely at the same 75% success rate that thebigword enjoyed, Judge Clarke asserted.
After uncovering the sham sites thebigword sent pre-action correspondence through intellectual property lawyers, Virtuoso Legal of Leeds and London, on 24 February 2017 alleging infringement of trade marks and passing off, to which Language Empire made no response. The firm did, the court ascertained, take the websites down on Yasar Zaman’s instruction shortly after. […]