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Tuesday, 8 June 2021

Bristol Rovers boss Joey Barton's assault trial abandoned as evidence 'lost in translation'

 https://www.itv.com/news/westcountry/2021-06-08/bristol-rovers-boss-joey-bartons-assault-trial-abandoned-as-evidence-lost-in-translation

8 June 2021

Bristol Rovers boss Joey Barton's assault trial abandoned as evidence 'lost in translation'

The trial of Bristol Rovers manager Joey Barton has been adjourned and the jury discharged because of communication difficulties. […]

Mr Stendel was giving evidence in German, which is his first language, and an interpreter was being used in the court in Sheffield.

But after a discussion with both the prosecution and defence Judge Jeremy Richardson QC halted proceedings, saying it was becoming difficult to ensure everything was being properly translated and understood.

“When something comes down to translation, it’s just not right to just struggle on, I became increasingly concerned things were getting lost in translation.” -  #Judge Jeremy Richardson QC

Before dismissing the jury he said: "There have been with Mr Stendel's evidence a multitude of difficulties."

He said Mr Stendel speaks with a "provincial or regional dialect" and was sat in a large court room causing an echo.

"A combination of those factors - the echo, the regional dialect - and the fact he was giving quite long answers, means some of his answers may have been mistranslated," Judge Richardson QC added.

"Both the translator here and the judge in the German court agreed there have been a few examples of mistranslation. That’s not fair to him [Mr Stendel], to Mr Barton and to you [the jury], because if we just went on we would be speculating." […]

PQ: 8th June 2021

 https://www.theyworkforyou.com/wrans/?id=2021-05-24.HL476.h

Ministry of Justice: Interpreters

Ministry of Justice written question – answered on 8th June 2021.

Baroness Coussins Crossbench

To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to increase the (1) qualifications, and (2) experience, required for interpreters to be listed on the Ministry of Justice register to the same levels as interpreters joining the National Register of Public Service Interpreters.

Baroness Coussins Crossbench

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many interpreters registered with the Ministry of Justice have been (1) removed from the register, or (2) otherwise sanctioned, as a result of the spot checks and in-person assessments carried out from 1 January 2019 by the quality assurance provider The Language Shop.

Baroness Coussins Crossbench

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 18 May (HL Deb, col 558) that interpreters "will be removed from the register if they fail to reach the required standard", what are the detailed components of "the required standard".

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice

The Ministry of Justice is committed to ensuring the justice system is supported by a suite of high- quality language service contracts, that meet the needs of all those that require them.

The contracts have a clearly defined list of qualifications, skills, experience and vetting requirements interpreters must meet, which have been designed to meet the needs of the justice system. These are set out in our contracts, which can be found at the following link:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/975cb99e-fec6-430f-8f31-fd532a907137?p=@=UFQxblRRPT0=NjJNT08

Our qualification and experience requirements and associated quality assurance arrangements provided by The Language Shop (TLS), have been carefully considered and have been designed so as to maintain the quality of interpretation provided under the contract, meet the demands and requirements of the Ministry and other contract users and encourage new entrants to the profession.

The Ministry of Justice will shortly be undertaking work to develop the next generation of Language Services contracts.

For the period 01/01/2019 – 21/05/2021, 169 language professionals have been removed and 40 language professionals have been sanctioned as a result of a Spot Check or In-Person Assessment.

The required standard comprises a number of different elements

All interpreters are required to meet the qualification requirements set out in the contract between the MoJ and the language service supplier. The requirements vary depending on the complexity of the bookings and the language in question. The specific requirement in each case is set out here: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/975cb99e-fec6-430f-8f31-fd532a907137?p=@=UFQxblRRPT0=NjJNT08

TLS review the qualifications at the point of carrying out an assessment of an interpreter and will remove the interpreter if the supplier fails to demonstrate that they hold the correct qualifications.

All interpreters are required to comply with the MoJ code of conduct at all times. Any serious breach of the code of conduct, observed through an assessment by TLS or identified and confirmed through a complaint investigation, will result in removal from the register.

Interpreters also have to demonstrate competence in language proficiency, interpreting/professional skills, and subject matter knowledge. Interpreters are regularly assessed to ensure their interpreting meets the requirements of the assignment, being observed across each of the three competencies.

Thursday, 3 June 2021

PQ: 3rd June 2021

 https://www.theyworkforyou.com/wrans/?id=2021-05-25.7265.h

Public Sector: Interpreters

Ministry of Justice written question – answered on 3rd June 2021.

Alex Sobel Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that only remunerated, registered and regulated interpreters are used by the (a) courts and (b) other public services.

Chris Philp The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department

The Ministry of Justice is committed to ensuring the justice system is supported by a suite of high- quality language service contracts, that meet the needs of all those that require them.

The Ministry commissions the services of suitably qualified language professionals through its contracted service providers, thebigword and Clarion Interpreting.

Language professionals provided by our contracted language service providers are sourced from the Ministry’s register. Only language professionals who meet the Ministry’s contractual requirements are included on the register, which is managed and audited by an independent language service provider, The Language Shop.

The contract has a clearly defined list of qualifications, skills, experience and vetting requirements language professionals must meet, which have been designed to meet the needs of the justice system.

The full details of the standards required for our Language Professionals is set out in our contracts, which can be found at the following link:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/975cb99e-fec6-430f-8f31-fd532a907137

The Language Shop make regular and independent assessments of language professionals carrying out assignments via the Ministry’s language services contracts, to ensure they meet the requirements of the contract between the Ministry and the supplier.

The Ministry is only responsible for services used under the Ministry of Justice contract.